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Mastics and sealants have been an integral part of the weather tightness for metal building systems since the industry’s inception decades ago. The critical procedures and sensitive materials place extreme ownership on the installer to uphold the integrity of the building system. As a component manufacturer who has over 70,000 systems installed throughout the United States, RCS has taken feedback from experienced erectors and applied it in the creation of a more effective and reliable mastic solution for installers of our curb systems. Our “Seven Bead” Mastic takes the assumption out of the seal.

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Advancements in the Pre-Engineered Metal Building segment of construction have been recently driven towards reducing energy
consumption or harnessing the thermal movement of materials, so why did RCS take on the decades old Butyl tape detail that has been one of the most critical aspects of weather tightness for building systems? Simple, they listened to the installers and discovered through material audit that the Triple Bead mastic of years past has an acute flaw that reduces the effectiveness of its conceptual sealant characteristics.

We say conceptual, because the profile of the “Triple Bead” works as intended in its designed state as a gasket, however after it has been tossed around in a box due to the logistics of shipping and then sat around the jobsite in the elements for extended periods, RCS discovered that the profile of the 2.5 inch “Triple Bead” never resembled it’s design and when bent, twisted or crushed, the tape had to be stretched by the installer in an effort to return to the designed characteristics leaving much less than the required composition. The durability of this critical component is too important for this variation in density as the result of typical storage and transportation. RCS has stepped up their “Seven Bead” proprietary mastic profile to tackle these discrepancies and ensure a higher quality product.

 Common Triple Bead Void at screw penetration due to reduced density viewable through Plexiglas test display.

Common Triple Bead Void at screw penetration due to
reduced density viewable through Plexiglas test display.

 RCS Seven Bead Expansion at screw penetration viewed through Plexiglas test display.

RCS Seven Bead Expansion at screw penetration viewed
through Plexiglas test display.

The purpose of Butyl tape is to seal and the nature is to conform. Its conformation is where the problem exists as material density changes too often before installation resulting in areas too thin for the triple ridges of the existing material profile to backfill the already thin areas where most installers run their fasteners as instructed across the industry. RCS has not changed the compounds of Butyl tape,
merely developed a thoughtful profile that backfills itself where the inconsistencies of density in the Triple Bead profile has resulted in gaps at screw penetrations. Both the Triple and Seven Bead mastics used in testing are in fact from the same company and were shipped via the same method. In addition to being ½” wider, the RCS profile is designed to eliminate the assumption that the lap is sealed through the over-development of density within the seven ridges of its profile therefore maintaining the effectiveness when stretched 1.5 times its natural state. RCS “Seven Bead” is shipping with all accessory packages that specify 2.5” or wider mastics in the installation details. This is not a substitute, this is a solution.

RCS is focused on product advancements such as the aforementioned “Seven Bead” mastic resulting in more reliable and effective solutions for our industry. We standout because we don’t leave details for the field to discern. “Total systems approach” is our message; problem solving is our mission. For more information regarding our specialties within the metal roofing industry, please contact us.

Written by: Clifton Reasor